Homebrew Recipe Calculator, Blog, How To, & Recipes

Jul
18
2012

Convert a Keg to a Keggle/Brew Pot

Building a keggle (brew kettle) from an old keg is a great way to get an inexpensive large stainless steel brew pot for your homebrew. Manufactured brewing kettles can be very expensive, they offer a variety of features but what if you just want to brew larger batches of beer without spending lots of money, the converted keg could be your answer. Make sure that you get your keg from a reputable source. I know there are many legal concerns with obtaining old kegs so make sure you find out what is legal. Also make sure that you know what you are doing, the keg can be under pressure and you could get seriously injured. We do not recommend doing this without expert help.

To convert my keg to a stainless steel brew pot I first had to cut off the top. I created a jig for my angle grinder to cut the top off the keg. I used a short 2x4 bolted to an angled piece of steel. A door handle drill bit, 2” I think, bolted to the 2x4 worked perfect to fit in the top of the keg. The handle of the angle grinder unscrewed and I was able to use it like a bolt to the angled steel.

After I cut the top off the keg, I used a Dremil and sandpaper to clean up the rough edges on the opening of the keggle. You don’t want to cut yourself on those rough cuts when cleaning out the keg.

I used a step drill bit to drill the holes for the weldless valve and sight glass. I picked up the wedless valve from my local home brew shop and the weldless sight glass/thermometer came from http://www.brewhardware.com/.

I built the keggle pickup tube from copper pipe purchased at my home improvement store. The pickup works okay. I try to whirlpool my wort in the brew pot, let it sit for 10 minutes, and then drain. I still seem to pick up quite a bit of hops. I might need to come up with another design or add some type of filter. If you have any suggestions please let me know.

I have brewed about 6 batches of homebrew in my converted keg and I absolutely love it. No more fear of boil-overs when doing 5 gallon batches. I have yet to do a 10 gallon batch but if I am ever so inclined I am ready. Not sure if I could mash for 10 gallons in my 10 gallon water cooler, it would have to be a small beer.

Comments (2) -

mmarksbury

When are you going to make me one?

jason

As soon as you find yourself an old keg. I still have the jig, I can let you borrow it anytime.

Pingbacks and trackbacks (1)+